What to See in Lima, Peru (with Map & Photos)

Lima is the capital of Peru, located on the Pacific coast in the valleys of the Chillon, Rimac and Lurin rivers. The city was founded by Francisco Pizarro in 1535 as the "City of Kings", and soon became the largest in the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru. After the Peruvian War of Independence, Lima became the capital of the Republic. Today, about a third of Peru's population lives in Lima.

Lima Peru
Lima Peru

Basic Moments


The huge bustling city is often associated primarily with poverty and pollution problems, but it is truly unique due to the friendliness and hospitality of the locals, as well as the fine rain of garua, which differs in the city from May to October. The historic center of Lima, built up with magnificent buildings during the Spanish colonial era, was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1988. Plaza Mayor with the 16th century cathedral, the Presidential Palace, the catacombs of the St. Francis Monastery will certainly interest the inquisitive traveler.

Lima Peru
Lima Peru

The city has many small beaches located in the suburban area of ​​Cieneguilla, and in the city of Chosika (Luri-gancho district) you can admire the wonderful green landscapes and take a break from the city noise. The endless expanse of the sprawling city is more like a few closely spaced small towns. The rhythm of life in Lima is slow, which makes the character of its inhabitants more stable and calm compared to many other South American cities.

Population, language, religion


The population of Lima (with suburbs) is about 7.8 million people, which is about a third of the population of Peru. The city is inhabited by Quechua and Aymara Indians, Spanish-speaking Peruvians, mestizos, Europeans, Japanese, Chinese and representatives of other Asian nations. There are two official languages: Spanish and Quechua. Believers are mostly Catholics.

Economy


Lima and its suburbs produce 80% of Peru's manufacturing output. Metalworking, chemical, textile, shoe, fish processing, automotive, electrical appliance industries are concentrated here. Also, all financial and banking centers of the state are concentrated in the capital, the representation in the city of offices of foreign corporations and companies is large. The intensively developing tourism business is quite widespread.

History of the development of the city


On January 18, 1535, the Spanish conquistador Francisco Pissaro founded the city of Ciudad de los Reyes, which means "royal city" in Spanish. However, among the local population, instead of this name, another name took root, given to the city along the Rimac River and eventually distorted into Lima. When Peru was proclaimed a Spanish Viceroyalty in 1543, Lima became the center of Spanish rule in South America. In September 1820, General San Martin landed with his army in Peru, captured Lima and the next year, on July 28, 1821, proclaimed the independence of the state of Peru, and Lima received the status of the capital. After the 2nd Pacific War, Lima for a long time (from 1884 to 1929) was in a state of deep economic crisis. And only by the 1930s the situation of the city began to stabilize. However, in times of political instability, lasting from the mid-1940s to the early 1990s, massive unemployment and high inflation were once again noted in the capital. Since 1993, there has been some progress in the economy of Peru; by the beginning of 1994, the economy of the capital and the country as a whole began to develop steadily. Currently, the economic and political situation in Lima can be described as stable.

Lima Peru
Lima Peru

Cultural Significance


The culture of Lima was greatly influenced by the Indian heritage of Peru, as well as the ancient civilization of the Incas who lived on Peruvian soil before it was conquered by the Spaniards. The legacy of the highly developed Inca civilization can be seen not only in the numerous archaeological sites and finds that are stored in the museums of Lima, but also in the modern folk art of the inhabitants of the capital of Peru.

The buildings of the colonial period are a mixture of Spanish and Indian styles, the combination of which the Peruvians called the Creole style. In addition to magnificent buildings built under the influence of Spanish and Indian cultures, Lima has several architectural structures built in the Mudéjar style, with a pronounced Moorish influence. Also in the capital you can see many examples of modern architecture. Among the museums of Lima, the National Museum of History should be noted; Museum of the Republic, whose expositions relate to the colonial era and the early period of independence; the National Museum of Anthropology and Archeology, which exhibits a rich collection of pre-Columbian art; Museum of the Viceroyalty, which stores samples of furniture, clothing and paintings of the colonial period; Natural History Museum "Javier Prado"; Gallery of Contemporary Peruvian Art, where you can get acquainted with the work of contemporary Peruvian artists.

New universities are opened almost every year in the country, in particular, in Lima, in addition to the world-famous University of San Marcos, there are several more higher educational institutions. A significant collection of books is kept in the National Library and university libraries. The capital is home to the National Conservatory and the Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1938. The orchestra's program is dominated by works by Peruvian composers: Andres Sas Rrchasal, Carlos Sanchez Malaga, Armando Gevaro Ocharo and others. Since the middle of the 16th century, the theater has occupied an important place in the cultural life of Lima.

In 1548, the first secular theatrical performance took place in San Pedro Square. Currently, the most famous theater in the country is the Municipal Theater in Lima, the premises of which are also used as a concert hall. Among the largest newspapers published in Lima, the Comercio newspaper, founded in 1839, is especially popular, as well as the Expresso, República and the official government publication Peruano. Since the middle of the 16th century, the theater has occupied an important place in the cultural life of Lima. In 1548, the first secular theatrical performance took place in San Pedro Square. Currently, the most famous theater in the country is the Municipal Theater in Lima, the premises of which are also used as a concert hall.

Among the largest newspapers published in Lima, the Comercio newspaper, founded in 1839, is especially popular, as well as the Expresso, República and the official government publication Peruano. Since the middle of the 16th century, the theater has occupied an important place in the cultural life of Lima. In 1548, the first secular theatrical performance took place in San Pedro Square. Currently, the most famous theater in the country is the Municipal Theater in Lima, the premises of which are also used as a concert hall. Among the largest newspapers published in Lima, the Comercio newspaper, founded in 1839, is especially popular, as well as the Expresso, República and the official government publication Peruano.

When to come


December to March are the sunniest days, however, to catch the city in full splendor, come during the carnival period or the Santa Rosa de Lima (August 30), when huge processions walk through the city, praising the patroness of the city.

Do not miss


  • Pachacamac - ruins of the Inca period in the valley of the river Lurin.
  • Chinatown.
  • Running at the Monterrico Hippodrome.
  • Indio Market - Make some great purchases at the Craft Market in the Miraflores Quarter.
  • Museum of Rafael Larco Herrera - in the mansion of the viceroy of the XVIII century. there is an exhibition of Peruvian art from the pre-Columbian era, including Inca artifacts.
  • Archaeological Museum.
  • The beaches of Santa Maria del Mar and Punta Hermosa.

Should know


Many of Lima's sprawling slums, known locally as "pueblos jovenes", lack basic amenities such as running water or electricity.

Lima Map