Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, Lijiang, China (with Map & Photos)

The Jade Dragon Snow Mountain (玉龙雪山) is a special natural landmark in the Lijiang area, China. Its amazing peaks can be climbed on 2 lifts, one of which is the highest in Asia, to a height of 4506 meters, on a ridge with stunning views of the glaciers. On the columns of the Daewelow turret, there are paired inscriptions left by the famous Chinese writer Guo Moruo. One of these inscriptions reads: "Heilongtan reservoir reflects thirteen peaks." The inscription matches the description of the local landscape - there are 13 peaks covered with ice and snow on Yulong Xueshan Mountain.

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China
Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China

Although Yulong Xueshan Mountain is not high and cannot be compared with the peaks of Tibet, its slopes are very steep. Therefore, to this day, there has not yet been a daredevil who could conquer the main peak of this mysterious snowy mountain.

The Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, lying in the clouds, hugs and guards the city of Lijiang. People say about it: "The mountain has four seasons at once, here every 5 kilometers of the path has its own climate." This mountain, called a treasury of plants, grows a variety of trees and shrubs, rare medicinal plants and amazingly beautiful flowers. The majestic main peak, 5596 m high, looks like an open fan. Yulongshan is the most important and beautiful mountain for the inhabitants of the city of Lijiang; many legends are associated with it.

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China
Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China

Residents of Lijiang consider the reflection of this mountain in the Black Dragon Pond as their symbol. The mountain is 35 km long and 20 km wide. Three cable cars lead up the mountain in succession. First stop: Spruce Meadow - 3,400 m, second: Yak Meadow - 3,700 m and Glacier Park (4,500 m).

On the first level in the Ganhaizi Meadow Valley, a grand ethnic show "Impressions of Lijiang" is held for tourists. This cultural show with the participation of 100 horsemen and 500 actors demonstrates the traditions and way of life of the peoples inhabiting these lands: Nasi, I, Bai. The show takes place on a giant plateau, surrounded by natural scenery of mountains and virgin forests with a 360 ° view.

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China
Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain is a mountain range or small mountain range in Yulong Naxi Autonomous County, Lijiang, in Yunnan Province, China. Its highest peak is called Shanqidou and is located above sea level.

Etymology


The Chinese name, Yulong Xueshan, translates directly as Jade Dragon Snow Mountain, sometimes translated as Yulong Mountain or Yulong Snow Mountain. Mount Naxi is called Mount Satseto.

History


In 1938, an expedition led by Australian lawyer, feminist, conservationist and mountaineer Marie Byles was unable to reach the summit due to bad weather. Bitterly disappointed in this failure, she became a follower of Buddhist thought.

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China
Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China

Shanzidu climbed only once, Tamotsu Nakamura, “East of the Himalayas,” American Alpine Journal, 2003, p. 146. May 8, 1987 by an American expedition. The summit team included Phil Peralta-Ramos and Eric Perlman. They climbed snowy ravines and limestone headwalls and faced high avalanche danger and rare defenses. They rated the breed's maximum technical difficulty on YDS 5.7.

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China
Jade Dragon Snow Mountain China

Austro-American botanist and explorer Joseph Rock lived for many years in the vicinity of Mount Satseto and wrote about the region and the Naxi peoples inhabiting it. An interest in Rock later drew the travel writer Bruce Chatwin to the mountain, of whom he wrote in an article published in The New York Times, Chatwin, Bruce. New York Times, March 16, 1986 and later, with a renaming of his collection of essays What Am I Doing Here? Chatwin, Bruce (1989) World of Rock, in What Am I Doing Here?, Vintage, p. 206 Chatwin's article inspired many subsequent travelers, including Michael Palin, Palin, Michael (2005), retrieved January 13, 2011. to visit this region.

Jade Dragon Snow Mountain Map