Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut, Egypt (with Map & Photos)

The Temple of Hatshepsut (معبد حتشبسوت) in ancient Egyptian Djeser-Djeseru or the Holy of Holies, is a magnificent ancient Egyptian construction erected in honor of Amon-Ra, god of the Sun. It takes its name from the Queen- pharaoh Hatshepsut of the 18th dynasty who had it built after crowning himself queen-pharaoh. The history of the temple is linked to this brave and ambitious woman who went above all to achieve what she considered hers.

Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut

Location


The Temple of Hatshepsut is located in the Deir el Bahari complex, on the west bank of the River Nile next to the Egyptian city of Luxor.

History


Hatshepsut was born from the union of Pharaoh Tutmosis I and Queen Ahmose as the youngest of four siblings of whom only she manages to reach adulthood. When Tuthmosis I dies she is the natural heir to the kingdom that her father has conquered. The struggle for power is unleashed by imposing those who support the coronation of Tutmosis II, a son of Tutmosis with a secondary wife. Hatshepsut, due to her status as a woman, is relegated to the role of queen and being married to her half brother.

Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut

From the union of both two girls but no boys are born, which again produces power struggles after the sudden death of Tutmosis II. Again, those who support naming a man are imposed, crowned king to a son of Tuthmosis II with a concubine. The new pharaoh, still a child, becomes Tuthmosis III. Due to her young age, Hatshepsut takes over the regency of Egypt and from that position of power she maneuvers to get rid of those who have twice relegated her and places her followers in positions of strength. With everything on her side, she proclaims herself Pharaoh of the Two Lands and firstborn of Amun by the name of Maatkara Hatshepsut.

During the seventh year of his tenure in the 15th century BC he had Amon-Ra built a temple next to the cliffs of Deir el-Bahari, on the west bank of the River Nile in the city of Thebes. The temple is built next to the temple of Mentuhotep II.

Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut

At his death, after 22 years of reign, Tuthmosis III regains the throne of Egypt and the temple of Hatshepsut suffers a series of intentional mutilations, perhaps by the new pharaoh, hurt by his long regency, or by clerics of Osiris, displaced to the enhance the cult of Amon-Ra.

Once the cult of the Egyptian gods disappeared, the temple fell into oblivion until at the end of the 18th century AD a conquering expedition led by Napoleon Bonaparte brought its remains to light. Subsequent studies by archaeologist Auguste Marietteen in the mid-19th century AD, and a complete, and somewhat controversial, reconstruction in the 20th century AD bring to our day one of the most impressive temples of ancient Egypt.

Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut

What to See in The Temple of Hatshepsut


The Hatshepsut Temple is unique in its style. It stands out for its large terraces and for being partly embedded in the mountain. It is dedicated to Amon-Ra, although like most Egyptian funerary temples it has rooms dedicated to Hathor and Anubis.

To access the Temple of Hatshepsut it is necessary to buy the ticket at the visitor center which is about 400 meters from the first terrace of the temple. The entrance fee is 100 Egyptian pounds, about 5 euros.

The duration of the visit is approximately 1 hour. To access the enclosure it is necessary to climb quite a few stairs, so access to cars or the disabled is limited. The opening hours are from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Temple of Hatshepsut
Temple of Hatshepsut

How to Get


Generally, the temple of Hatshepsut is visited within an Egypt vacation package, where we will be taken by bus along with the visit to the Valley of the Kings.

If you are traveling on your own you can take a taxi to the temple. This will need 45 minutes due to the turn you must take to cross the Nile.

Mortuary Temple of Hatshepsut Map